Tennis Forehand Relaxed Arm

Tennis forehand relaxed arm is one of the most important concepts to understand and master. If you can relax arm on your forehand or relax generally, your game will really jump to the next level. There are several pretty easy ways to work on relaxing and therefore getting more depth, but you must focus on releasing tension at specific times. You don’t want to focus too much on relaxation during your swing path because often, it is too difficult to be successful during this phase of the stroke. You will feel mechanical, instead of smooth and effortless.

Grip

  • First thing to do in order to have relaxed arm on forehand is to make sure you are using the right grip pressure.
  • On a 1-10 point scale with 1 being no tension and 10 being very tense, you don’t want to grip the racquet tighter than a 4 if you want to feel relaxed.
  • See if you can lightly hold the racquet as you start your swing.
  • You should naturally grip the racquet a little tighter at contact, but you won’t have to think about this.
  • Also, please avoid the killer block grip that so many players are guilty of and are not even aware of. Essentially the block grip involves holding the racquet with the fingers scrunched together. This will create more tension before you even think about hitting the ball, and you won’t be able to recover form it. Instead of using block grip, angle your hand like you’re shaking hands with the racquet and spread your index finger a bit. This will facilitate not only the correct racquet angle at contact, but also a looser grip.

Targets

  • If you’re struggling at the end of long rallies with your depth make sure you’re exaggerating on your targets, especially the longer a point goes. Aim past the baseline or even try to hit the ball into the fence (it will be very tough to actually do this if you have topspin on your forehand. Exaggerating your aim the longer a point goes should help with depth.
  • Don’t be afraid of missing long, because you want to try to change your pattern of hitting short. Missing long might be the best thing for you because it will force you to hit deep as you relax your hand. Don’t let your shots land shorter and shorter, the longer the point goes. Focus more on the process instead of the result.

Finish

  • If you are struggling with getting depth on your forehand, make sure to exaggerate by finishing high. The more nervous you are, the lower your hand will naturally finish across your body so you have to counteract that feeling by finishing higher. Simply put, the higher the finish the deeper the ball will go. This is a full proof way to stop hitting short or in the net the longer a point goes.
  • To emphasize this high finish feeling, you can actually catch the racquet in front of your opposite shoulder and in front of the body which will promote extension. The legendary coach, Robert Lansdorp, always had his players focus on extension by catching the racquet on the forehand finish.

Open The Fingers At The Finish

  • At the end of your tennis forehand swing you can also work on relaxation. How? At the end of your swing, catch the racquet with your non dominant hand. Open the fingers on the dominant hand and feel all the tensions release form the hand. Complete relaxation.
  • Relaxing at the end of the stroke actually helps you lower the tension throughout the entire swing. Cool trick, right? If this does not work as well as you want, then you can actually take it a step further and remove the hand completely off the racquet after your catch the racquet with your non dominant hand. This forces you to completely relax the hand as the hand go out towards the target when you swing.

 

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