Tennis Forehand Tip: Use The Buggy Whip Forehand Finish  Against The Slice

 

Ready to learn a cool buggy whip forehand tip to handle those low and slicing balls successfully?

I know many players who struggle to deal with a low and slicing ball coming to their tennis forehand.

They’re miss hitting this shot or dumping it straight into the net, which makes them feel frustrated or lose confidence in their game.

That’s why I’m going to reveal a simple tip to help you handle the low forehand against these slice balls more effectively and efficiently.

Let’s get started!

 

The Buggy Whip Tennis Forehand

The buggy whip forehand is a very versatile shot that can be deployed throughout a match.

You can use it when returning serve (like Serena Williams and Pete Sampras), when you are forced to hit the ball on the run (as Pete Sampras, Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic), when you want to create more spin and angle on a crosscourt ball (like Rafael Nadal).

Almost all the top players use the buggy whip at some point in a match. I was a big fan of using the buggy whip on different types of shots, especially on balls where I felt a little late or off-balanced on the forehand.

One time where you can use the buggy whip finish is against balls that come at you with slice.

This is a buggy whip forehand tip that can make a huge difference. Most players never think to use the buggy whip finish in this situation, but it really can get you out of a lot of trouble.

Imagine your opponent slicing the ball to you forehand, the ball skids through the court and you either feel rushed or late and don’t get a clean hit on the ball.

You may even miss-hit the ball a little or chunk the ball into the net. You lose confidence in your forehand and wonder why you keep missing this “easy” shot.

 

How To Use The “Hook” Finish On Your Forehand

The reality is that you might be swinging across your body which keeps you from getting enough extension.

But if you use the buggy whip “hook” finish to get outside the ball and handle the low skidding slice, you will feel a newfound control that will make hitting this shot so much fun.

Instead of struggling to get the low slicing ball to rise over the net and to create enough spin to drop into play, you can simply finish higher using the buggy whip finish.

Using this buggy whip forehand tip will allow you to naturally create more topspin.

You’ll get more lift on the ball, which is crucial when dealing with a low slice.

Top players use this buggy whip finish because it’s just easier to swing this way especially in stressful situations.

For instance, Rafael Nadal loves using his buggy whip forehand to hit down the line to change directions and dominate his opponents from the baseline.

This buggy whip forehand tip against the low slice can really help you make more balls, hit the ball with more topspin, take time away from your opponent, and increase your confidence.

 

By Jeff Salzenstein, Founder Tennis Evolution
Jeff is a former top 100 ATP player and USTA high-performance coach
committed to helping players and coaches all over the world improve.

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4 Comments

  1. Marcin

    Great tip. I often use this finishing while responding to slice balls and I have to say it helps a lot.

    Reply
  2. stuey

    Thanks. Especially useful for me as I’m a lefty with a semi-western grip, and RH club players are always giving me this sort of ball…..thanks!

    Reply

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