The Backswing Is Different

In today’s video lesson, you’re going to discover how you can improve your 1 handed backhand, a shot that any players struggle with. Interestingly, getting clarity on what to do with your backswing can make all the difference with your 1 handed backhand.

A lot of players think they have to keep their backswing short on the 1 handed backhand just like they do on the forehand and 2 handed backhand.

However, the this shot is a different animal when it comes to the backswing. You actually should take a big backswing when you have time on the 1 hander. The way to create a lot of racquet head acceleration is to take full swing.

Make A Massive Shoulder Turn

When you watch Roger Federer, Stan Wawrinka, Richard Gasquet, and other top pros you’ll notice that they take a massive shoulder turn that allows him to create a lot of racquet head speed by using their entire body.

Because of this big shoulder turn, the racquet goes back behind the body a lot further than on the 2 handed backhand.

Most great 1 handed backhand get the strings to face the back fence on the backswing.

If you’re having trouble creating racquet head speed, try creating a bigger shoulder turn and taking the racquet back further behind your body.

Click here to discover another powerful 1 handed backhand lesson.

Recent Post

How To Play Against A Big Forehand

So, you want to know how to play against a big forehand, and win? Well, this article will show you how. Playing against someone who has a big forehand…

“How Can I Stop Losing To Pushers?”

Have you ever wondered to yourself “how can I stop losing to pushers?”. They’re one of the most annoying types of opponent you can play against. Luckily…

20 Comments

  1. Marcin

    I rather prefer to teach players to take the racquet short without crossing the line of the body on the backswing. I do this because I simply see that by taking the racquet further back, players play more with their “arm” instead of the whole body as also they are not able to quickly adjust while coping with deep and hard balls what results in late shots.

    Reply
    • Jeff Salzenstein

      Marcin, For the 1 hander, I don’t agree. Let’s teach players how to do it properly using a full shoulder turn which will create a fuller backswing.

      Reply
    • Paul

      A big backswing does help, but you have to do it right. This is where you really have to prepare early, so you can flow back out to the ball when it comes.

      Reply
      • Jeff Salzenstein

        Very true, Paul!

        Reply
  2. Colin

    Jeff, this video/tip was timely. Thank you. I have been working trying to improving the my shoulder turn. I’m keen to try the racket back behind the body in the racket prep stage which as you illustrate allows for more upper body rotation. I think Fed accomplishes this without bringing the racket behind the body until he starts to swing at the ball which indeed has his racket face pointing to the back fence.

    Reply
    • Jeff Salzenstein

      Awesome, Colin! Thank you for sharing!

      Reply
  3. Javier Gomez

    Hello Jeff,

    Excellent backswing tip. I do it… Please I have a question for you, Does the same thing happen with the forehand? I mean, big backswing for the forehand. Thanks a lot.

    Reply
    • Jeff Salzenstein

      Hi Javier, No…you want your forehand to be more compact!

      Reply
  4. Brian (from Brazil)

    It is important to create the separation angle (alignment between shoulders will be different comparing with the alignment from the hips) in order to get more power and top spin. Separation angle of 1 handed backhand is bigger than 2 handed backhand.

    Reply
    • Jeff Salzenstein

      Good point, Brian!

      Reply
  5. Murielle

    I’m still struggling with my one-hand backhand. This video is great and I hope it will help me to get better with it. Thank’s a lot !

    Reply
    • Jeff Salzenstein

      You are more than welcome, Murielle:)

      Reply
  6. Lee

    Just so everyone knows – Jeff is a lefty. That righty one-handed looked pretty natural. Well done. Couldn’t agree more with the longer take-back on this shot.

    Reply
    • Jeff Salzenstein

      Thank you, Lee but we did film it lefty and flipped the video. I wish I was that good righty.

      Reply
  7. Frank

    I was always taught that one should learn to control the ball before going for power, and that when one is making errors one should dial back the power until the timing returns.

    The one thing I never figure out, though, when my topspin backhand was unreliable — was how to regain steadiness by hitting a slow, soft topspin backhand.

    Reply
    • Jeff Salzenstein

      Hard to have a short backswing on the 1 hander and do it right!

      Reply
  8. Murielle

    Hi Jeff !
    I find this video very helpful, thank’s a lot !

    Reply
    • Jeff Salzenstein

      You are welcome, Murielle:)

      Reply
  9. Dennis

    Jeff, I noticed that Federer and Wawrinka take the racquet back with it pointing straight up and the elbow stays bent during the shoulder rotation. When they’re ready to hit they straighten the arm, drop it down into the power position (raquet strings pointing to the fence), and then swing forward. On your takeback you keep a straighter arm during the shoulder rotation. I do find your method easier as I don’t have to think about straightening the arm on the forward swing. Any thoughts?

    Reply
    • Jeff Salzenstein

      Hi Dennis, if it is easier for you to keep the arm straighter, than I would it!

      Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *